ARC: The Revolution of Jack Frost by K.M. Robinson

The Revolution of Jack Frost.jpg

goodreads-synopsis

No one inside the snow globe knows that Morozoko Industries is controlling their weather, testing them to form a stronger race that can survive the fall out from the bombs being dropped in the outside world—all they know is that they must survive the harsh Winter that lasts a month and use the few days of Spring, Summer, and Fall to gather enough supplies to survive.

When the seasons start shifting, Genesis and her boyfriend, Jack, know something is going on. As their team begins to find technology that they don’t have access to inside their snow globe of a world, it begins to look more and more like one of their own is working against them.

Genesis soon discovers Morozoko Industries is to blame, but when a foreign enemy tries to destroy their weather program to make sure their destructive life-altering bombs succeed in destroying the outside world, their only chance is to shut down the machine that is spinning out of control and save the lives of everyone inside the bunker–at any cost.

commentary

*✭˚・゚✧*・゚*✭˚・゚✧*・゚* *✭˚・゚✧*・゚*✭˚・゚✧*・゚**✭˚・゚✧*・゚*✭˚・゚✧*・゚*

Thank you Netgalley for an arc of The Revolution of Jack Frost for an honest review. All opinions are my own.

*✭˚・゚✧*・゚*✭˚・゚✧*・゚* *✭˚・゚✧*・゚*✭˚・゚✧*・゚**✭˚・゚✧*・゚*✭˚・゚✧*・゚*

Initially, I was going to wait to review the book closer to the publishing date, BUT, The Revolution of Jack Frost proved to be cliched af! I’m disappointed in it. Here’s why:

I made predictions about the story and its progression as I began the book…I DID NOT THINK THAT MY PREDICTIONS WOULD COME TRUE…

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♦️ Dystopian World ✔️

♦️ Lack of World Building  ✔️

♦️ One dimensional protagonist  ✔️

♦️ No buildup to a romantic relationship  ✔️

♦️ Government Facilities  ✔️

♦️ Test Subjects  ✔️

♦️ Too many random characters  ✔️

*✭˚・゚✧*・゚*✭˚・゚✧*・゚* *✭˚・゚✧*・゚*✭˚・゚✧*・゚**✭˚・゚✧*・゚*✭˚・゚✧*・゚*

The Revolution of Jack Frost proved to be the MOST cliched book that I read in 2018. I didn’t want to be a Negative Nancy, but this book can be avoided. I was hoping this arc was going to be a Jack Frost retelling, but not this…because this book is extremely predictable. The reading process was not fun, and it was quite dreadful to continue the book. I almost dnfed it, but I managed to finish it…(╬ಠ益ಠ)

The concept was interesting, but I felt that Jack should have been the main protagonist…out of all these randomly selected characters introduced in this series, Jack was the ONLY one to get some sort of personality! The story is told in Genesis’ pov, and SHE HAD NO PERSONALITY BESIDES BEING THE GIRLFRIEND OF JACK…I know more about Jack than I do about Genesis. What’s the point of having a MC when the reader hardly knows anything about their interests, ideas, quirks????? Sadly, this book left a bitter taste in my mouth…

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Most disappointing Jack Frost retelling ever…but the prologue have the best opening.

He was a force of nature. He could warm your soul like the sun and then bury you in ice the next second. He was more destructive than any other universal element or could ever be. It was his way, to be like a hurricane crashing upon the shores, or lightning splintering everything in its path. He was a force. But he was my force. And in the end, it didn’t matter, because he disappeared, just like the weather always does. Here for one brief moment and gone the next. His name was Jack and his love for me was like a flood, now frozen over.

Final Rating: ⭐ (1.5)

Publishing Date: November 6th, 2018

The Cruel Prince by Holly Black

The Cruel PRince

goodreads-synopsis

Of course I want to be like them. They’re beautiful as blades forged in some divine fire. They will live forever.

And Cardan is even more beautiful than the rest. I hate him more than all the others. I hate him so much that sometimes when I look at him, I can hardly breathe.

Jude was seven when her parents were murdered and she and her two sisters were stolen away to live in the treacherous High Court of Faerie. Ten years later, Jude wants nothing more than to belong there, despite her mortality. But many of the fey despise humans. Especially Prince Cardan, the youngest and wickedest son of the High King.

To win a place at the Court, she must defy him–and face the consequences.

As Jude becomes more deeply embroiled in palace intrigues and deceptions, she discovers her own capacity for trickery and bloodshed. But as betrayal threatens to drown the Courts of Faerie in violence, Jude will need to risk her life in a dangerous alliance to save her sisters, and Faerie itself.

commentary

Ten years ago, a 17 year old Michelle bought a copy of Tithe by Holly Black at Borders. This version of myself was excited for this book, and I hated it. I vowed to myself to never read another Holly Black book ever again. Yes, I was immature. And here I am now, finding myself finished with The Cruel Prince. 

Perhaps it was the hype and bookstagram that led me to read The Cruel Prince. This book has received phenomenal love and praise, but I found it to be problematic. Let’s just say that I am not the biggest fan of Jude and Cardan’s romance. I can see why others may love it since it is a slow burn romance.

Beginning with what I did enjoy from this book. Each character was flawed, and it was hard to like anyone, but it works well for this book. Jude was a bit irritating, but endearing for me. Jude has ambitions and goals, and she knows that she is limited as a mortal in the fae world. Jude seeks power in order to overcome the challenges of being human. She knows that in order to best the fae, she has to become better than them. Jude does love the fae world, while in the mortal world, she does not fit in. Jude has been shaped by her childhood growing up in a different world. Though Jude and Taryn do not belong with the Fae, they do not have a home to go back to in the human realm. Whereas, their older sister Vivi, she loves the mortal world more than anything else, even though she is half fae and is supposed to have a stronger bond with her fellow faeries. Though the story is told in Jude’s pov, I would say that Vivi is the rebel of the family because she longs to be in world with humans and does not comply with the traditions of her people. Taryn seeks assimilation to the faerie world by trying to be in her best behavior with others. Taryn wants to fit in, and does not seek trouble unlike her sister Jude.

Reading this book, I liked the relationship of the twins. Jude is tough, strong, and does not back down. She is emotionally driven, especially when it concerns the safety of Taryn. While Taryn is softer, and kinder. I did like how both sisters were mirror image of each other. Though, I would have liked to have read some of Taryn’s pov. My favorite non-romantic relationship had to be the dynamic between Jude and her adoptive father Madoc. Madoc murdered her parents, but Jude still loved him. Due to his beliefs, he shaped Jude to be fully a good adversary. He trained Jude, but he loved her back. He had his own interests that he sought for himself, and yet, he thought about the safety and concern for his family. Madoc wanted the best for his daughters despite having no blood relation.

What I really loved was the scheming royals and their political plans. Let’s just say that the buildup to the coronation and the events that take place afterward is the stronger half of the story. The first half of the story is not as great as the second half. Let’s just say that it’s dark, intense, and reminds me a bit of Game of Thrones. Ha ha. Honestly, I feel that the title of the Cruel Prince belongs to Balekin rather than Cardan.

My issue with The Cruel Prince is the constant bullying that Jude endures coming from the entourage of Cardan. The romance between Jude and Cardan is not the best. I would have love if Cardan was more of the stoic type that ignored Jude rather than allowing his friends to have free reign to torture and nearly kill Jude. Honestly, it was really difficult for me to root for Cardan and Jude. Jude was placed under a lot of danger especially when dealing with Cardan’s friends. I get that Cardan is a victim of abuse, but that does not justify his behavior towards Jude. I am a bigger fan of Jude getting the power she deserves. I like Cardan as well, but shipping him with Jude, I am not seeing it. Since this is the first book, my opinions can change with The Wicked King. 

Anyways, Locke was a trash character. I had a feeling that he was manipulating the romances between him and Jude. I don’t like that Locke was the figure that was tearing the relationship between Jude and Taryn. Learning about Taryn in the later half of the book changed my view on her. I did like her, but after finishing the book, not a fan. In a way, it can be argued that Taryn sought her own power to marry a fae. Though, I don’t like the message that she chose a boy over her sister.

My last issue with The Cruel Prince was the pacing. I felt that some parts needed to be fleshed out more such as Jude’s training under the Court of Shadows. Because The Court of Shadows does play a big role in Jude’s life, I would have at least liked there to be more interactions between her and the other members. It felt that she instantly became this fully equipped spy. I felt some areas could have been explained more. The pacing felt odd. For example, it was implied that Jude was strategic throughout the book, but the author could have written how Jude was strategic to begin with. It did a lot of telling, but not showing. Though, it was not my favorite book, it was entertaining. I want to see how the events will play into The Wicked King.

Final Rating: ⭐⭐⭐ (3.5)

The Beau & The Belle by R.S. Grey

the beau and the bellegoodreads-synopsis

Beau Fortier starred in most of my cringe-worthy teenage fantasies.

I met him when I was a junior in high school, a time that revolved exclusively around bad hair, failed forays into flirting, and scientific inquiries into which brand of toilet paper worked best for stuffing bras.

That is, until Beau moved into the small guest house just beyond my bedroom window.

A 24-year-old law student at Tulane, Beau was as mysterious to me as second base (both in baseball and in the bedroom). He was older. Intimidating. Hot. Boys my age had chicken legs and chubby cheeks. Beau had calloused hands and a jaw cut from steel. Our interactions were scarce—mostly involving slight stalking on my end—and yet deep down, I desperately hoped he saw me as more of a potential lover than a lovesick loser.

Turns out, I was fooling myself. My fragile ego learned that lesson the hard way.

Now, ten years later, we’re both back in New Orleans, and guess who suddenly can’t take his eyes off little ol’ me.

My old friend, Mr. Fortier.

But things have changed. I’m older now—poised and confident. My ego wears a bulletproof vest. The butterflies that once filled my stomach have all perished.

When I was a teenager, Beau warned me to guard my heart.

Let’s hope he knows how to guard his.

commentary

This book review is LONG overdue. The first R.S. Grey novel I read was Chasing Spring, and even to this day, I still gush about it. SO, I have been following the author on her social media, and I am a huge fan of her covers for adult books. Now, I was in the mood to read a R.S. Grey book, especially her adult books…now how bad could it possibly be?? Those were my initial thoughts, but, boy did I cringed throughout my reading experience!

Maybe I am not the best person to turn to when recommending Adult books…I felt this book was uncomfortable for me. I wanted to go back to my YA books, and not touch a New Adult book.

So, what had happen was that this book included a very questionable relationship between Beau and Lauren. In the first part of the book, Lauren is a teenager that actively lusts for Beau. I had no problems with it. I have to admit that the author wrote Lauren as convincingly human as she could be. Lauren was realistic, and she developed a crush on a much older guy…now my main issue was the behavior of Beau towards Lauren in the first part…He was aware of the very QUESTIONABLE relationship they could have gotten into in the first portion of the book. YET, he felt the same for her…I felt gross…

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Lauren was the worst protagonist as well. She would get mad at Beau for not trying to flirt with her, or be her boyfriend. She wanted a relationship with him, though he kept repeating to her that she was UNDERAGE! This book has no need for the REVENGE element. The protagonist was so stupid…I can’t even. Lauren was so infuriating…and out of all the least liked characters on my list, she is now officially NUMBER ONE.

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Other than that, this was supposed to be a romantic comedy, and yet I found myself neither laughing nor amused. Maybe this wasn’t the book for me. I wasn’t satisfied with either character. Lauren as an adult acted as if she had never gotten away from her cringing teen phase. I wanted Lauren to be a changed person, especially when Beau reappeared into her life. I wanted Lauren to be strong…but I guess I had too many expectations going into this book. May I consider another Adult book from R.S. Grey…maybe….I guess I can try for next year or in the next five years. I was in the mood for something romantic…and yet I found myself hating every bit of this book. I’m disappointed, but this was not marketed for my demographic.

Final Rating: ⭐ (1.5)

ARC: Darius The Great Is Not Okay by Adib Khorram

Darius The Great is Not Okay Goodreads Synopsis:

Darius doesn’t think he’ll ever be enough, in America or in Iran. Hilarious and heartbreaking, this unforgettable debut introduces a brilliant new voice in contemporary YA.

Darius Kellner speaks better Klingon than Farsi, and he knows more about Hobbit social cues than Persian ones. He’s about to take his first-ever trip to Iran, and it’s pretty overwhelming–especially when he’s also dealing with clinical depression, a disapproving dad, and a chronically anemic social life. In Iran, he gets to know his ailing but still formidable grandfather, his loving grandmother, and the rest of his mom’s family for the first time. And he meets Sohrab, the boy next door who changes everything.

Sohrab makes sure people speak English so Darius can understand what’s going on. He gets Darius an Iranian National Football Team jersey that makes him feel like a True Persian for the first time. And he understand that sometimes, best friends don’t have to talk. Darius has never had a true friend before, but now he’s spending his days with Sohrab playing soccer, eating rosewater ice cream, and sitting together for hours in their special place, a rooftop overlooking the Yazdi skyline.

Sohrab calls him Darioush–the original Persian version of his name–and Darius has never felt more like himself than he does now that he’s Darioush to Sohrab. When it’s time to go home to America, he’ll have to find a way to be Darioush on his own.

Commentary:

tumblr_inline_niyn5ntHcI1ry72eo I received the arc for Darius The Great Is Not Okay when I attended Yallwest, all opinions are my own. tumblr_inline_niyn5ntHcI1ry72eo  ʕ灬→ᴥ←灬ʔ

I am trying to read as much as possible before going back to my fall semester of my senior year at university. I picked up Darius The Great Is Not Okay by Adib Khorram for my July book of the month. I was immediately drawn to the cover, the colors and details are by far my favorite.

Darius Kellner is a biracial teenager who suffers from depression. He fells outcasted in his school, and his family, especially by his father. Darius understands that he is not normal. He is a bit on the heavy side, nerdy, and doesn’t socialize with people. His father has his own ambitions for his son in order for Darius to fit in with the normal boys in school. In addition, Darius is a victim of being bullied often by the popular boys. I felt quite sad for Darius due his illness, and how it seem like nothing was going his way.

Darius also suffers from an identity crisis because he is biracial. Though he looks Persian on the outside, he is far more Americanized. Darius could hardly speak to his grandparents in Farsi. He feels socially awkward with his Persian family because he does not fit in, and mental illness is not spoken of. He compares himself with his younger sibling who speaks Farsi like the pro.

A family trip to Iran shakes Darius’s world. He is introduced to his mother’s homeland and experiences an overall change because of it. Due to unfortunate circumstances, Darius’s grandfather is slowing dying. The family trip is supposed to connect the family together, and bring Darius closer together to his Persian history. Darius experiences different events in his short trip abroad. He becomes best friends with Sohrab, who immediately accepts him, though Darius completely does not understand why. Darius feels he has multiple flaws, despite being surrounded by people who love and support him. (灬♥ω♥灬)

If you go into this book thinking it is a romance, that’s not the case. For me, I did feel that Darius had feelings for Sohrab because of their connection, and their trusting friendship. What stood out for me was the relationship between Darius and his father, Stephen Kellner. Though both have depression, each character handles their depression differently. Stephen Kellner expects Darius to be masculine, and be normal. He does not want his son to be a victim of bullying. There is miscommunication and tense conversations between Darius and his father. It was hard for both of them to come to an understanding. Another aspect that shone in the book was how older generations treat mental illness. Darius tried keeping his depression a secret from his grandparents. It is hard to communicate with family members when it comes to mental illness. This caused a lot of awkward moments.

The writing was quite interesting to say the least. I was not the biggest fan of the writing style, and it took me a while to get used to…and it honestly seemed there was going to be a romance between Darius and Sohrab. I was expecting it for the very last chapters of the book…and it left me disappointed. I would have loved if the author had explored Darius sexuality more. Some scenes did feel that Darius was flirting, but it was a bit frustrating that this never led anywhere. It also felt that Darius kept reminding readers that he is not fully Persian, nor will ever be. I understand his identity crisis, but it was a constant reminder in most chapters…it did get really annoying. (╬ Ò ‸ Ó)

Honestly, this was a fast read for me. Darius deserved the world and more, he was really sensitive, and he really needed love. Let’s say, I can relate with Darius when it comes to mental illness. It was good, but I am sure others will love it more than me. ٩(๑•◡-๑)۶ⒽⓤⒼ❤

Final Rating: ⭐⭐⭐ (3.75)

 

ARC: Furyborn by Claire Legrand

martinandlaura

goodreads-synopsis

Follows two fiercely independent young women, centuries apart, who hold the power to save their world…or doom it.

When assassins ambush her best friend, the crown prince, Rielle Dardenne risks everything to save him, exposing her ability to perform all seven kinds of elemental magic. The only people who should possess this extraordinary power are a pair of prophesied queens: a queen of light and salvation and a queen of blood and destruction. To prove she is the Sun Queen, Rielle must endure seven trials to test her magic. If she fails, she will be executed…unless the trials kill her first.

A thousand years later, the legend of Queen Rielle is a mere fairy tale to bounty hunter Eliana Ferracora. When the Undying Empire conquered her kingdom, she embraced violence to keep her family alive. Now, she believes herself untouchable–until her mother vanishes without a trace, along with countless other women in their city. To find her, Eliana joins a rebel captain on a dangerous mission and discovers that the evil at the heart of the empire is more terrible than she ever imagined.

As Rielle and Eliana fight in a cosmic war that spans millennia, their stories intersect, and the shocking connections between them ultimately determine the fate of their world–and of each other.

commentaryHey guys, it has been nearly a year since I last wrote a book review. Sounds crazy? I know. I’ve been busy with my undergrad education and I occasionally read on the side, but didn’t have enough time to read as I used to. My finals are over, and I am attempting my first book review of the year. I have been reading a lot more, and felt inspired to write once again.

My good friend had an extra copy of Furyborn by Claire Legrand that she recieved in the Fairyloot Novemeber 2017 box. I traded her a couple books for it because I was highly looking forward to reading Furyborn. For my list of 2018 books, Furyborn was high on my list. I took Furyborn to the Philippines spring break vacation, but I never managed to pick it up. Returning to the States, and readjusting to my school schedule, I manange to find time to read Furyborn.

Darn it! I was hoping that Furyborn was going to have a lot of action and kickass female protagonists, but I am highly disappointed with what I read. Actually, extremely disappointed. I wanted to drop the book so badly.

What went wrong? Despite the prologue being the best written chapter in the book, it gave so many spoilers away! Especially concerning Rielle. The book is about two prophecized queens. One queen is told to bring destruction, whereas the other queen is the opposite. The prologue lets the reader know that Rielle is the Blood Queen. I wanted some buildup to this story. It sucks that as a reader, you know that Rielle becomes the queen to bring destruction to the world. In addition, the prologue gave away the connection Rielle has with Eliana despite the two characters living in two different time periods.

Which storyline was better? In Furyborn, there are two storylines to follow. One is Rielle and the past events that led to the decline of magic. She undergoes trials to prove that she is the Sun Queen, but you would already know that she becomes the Blood Queen. Reading her chapters were a bit frustrating because you know the fate of Rielle. You know that she will pass the trials and betray her people. I wanted to skip her chapters. Finally, the villain was revealed in the prologue! THERE WAS NO BUILDUP TO THIS STORY.  When it comes to Rielle, she is easily manipulated by those around her. She has the ability of all 7 powers in her kingdom. When Rielle starts hearing voices, she accepts doesn’t question it! Rielle converses with the voice in her head that happens to be a guy who she doesn’t know. Instead of worrying about her mental state, she falls in love with the voice…and converses with her new voice…and seeks advice from this voice…never having met this person….ugh. The story presents a frustrating love triangle in which Rielle is stuck between loving her childhood friend Prince Audric, and the voice in her head, Corien…I hated this love triangle so badly. 

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When it comes to Eliana’s pov, she was a frustrating character as well. She is known as The Dread of Orline. Eliana is supposed to be a badass assassin, but the story presents a character with wishy washy mentality. It was hard understanding the plot of Eliana’s chapters. I can’t take Eliana seriously. At least, I was spared from reading about a tedious love triangle. But once again, this story is filled with insta-love. The guy characters are not well developed. Prince Audric was okay. He was understanding of Rielle, and never questioned her motives. As for Simon, you find out who he is in the prologue as well. I would have placed the prologue near the end of the book to have a shocking revelation, but I guess that there is more to be told about Rielle later on in the series…

What Furyborn lack was introducing the folklore of the land. Angels are the villains of the book, and they have been locked behind a gate. But you don’t know what they did? This book hardly mentions the mythology, which would have been a great addition. I would have rated this book higher if I need more details about the angels. As for the magic system, everyone gets their power from the empirium, which is not explained. I’ll assume its an omnipresent power activator or a god that existed in the world. Where was the world buidling in this book? The stakes were high, but I did not find myself attached to the charactesrs.  Furyborn was a hot mess for me, and it is such as shame. The cover is gorgeous, the synoposis sounded amazing, but the delivery was not there. As for other books in the series, I might check out the following book to see what happens. Hopefully the author improves the story, but you can only hope.

The Gods Lie by Kaori Ozaki

Natsuru Nanao, a 6th grader who lives alone with his mother, strikes up an unlikely friendship with the reserved and driven Rio Suzumura. Natsuru plays hookey from soccer camp that summer, and instead of telling the truth to his mother, he spends all his time with Rio and her kid brother at their rickety house, where a dark secret threatens to upend their fragile happiness.

Add to Goodreads

I kept seeing this manga being advertised on my Amazon recommendations, and I decided to check it out. I read this manga in under an hour. I do recommend checking out the The Gods Lie from the library rather than buying it.

When it came to The Gods Lie, I was captivated by the cover and the title. The title is what drew me in. I did not anticipate finishing the manga in less than an hour. The Gods Lie felt rushed. There was not enough material for me to be satisfied. I felt that The Gods Lie could have had at least five more chapters to have a solid, well rounded story that could have been memorable for readers.

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What I liked from reading The Gods Lie was the unlikely romance between Natsuru Nanao and Rio Suzumura. I felt that there relationship was cute, but I did not like that how rushed the romance was given this manga was five chapters long. So the romance was very fast paced for me. It felt as if they became friends and suddenly they fell in love with each other. I also liked that The Gods Lie dealt with maturity, especially for Rio Suzumara’s case. Rio had to be the adult in her family despite being a pre-teen. While her classmates were enjoying their youth, Rio had to be an adult. She had to tackle the responsibilities that were literally thrown to her. In addition, Rio and her younger brother had to deal with abandonment from their father. Rio had to be both mother and father to her younger brother without the help from any other relative. At the same time, Natsuru learns about Rio’s situation and becomes her protector. Natsuru learns to love Rio despite their differences.

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As for the twist, I did see it coming. The manga does give small hints about the twist. So when it was revealed, it was sad but not shocking to say the least. The ending had a hopeful ending for the protagonists. T Originally I was going to rate The Gods Lie a four out of five, but after much thought this manga is a solid three.

Final Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Bungo Stray Dogs Reading Challenge

 

Bungo Stray Dogs

Hey everyone, I wanted to create a reading challenge based on Bungo Stray Dogs. I finished watching season two today and I am so excited to see how this anime will continue once season 3 arrives. Because I felt inspired, I decided to do a reading challenge. I am not sure if anyone has made this challenge yet from what I’ve seen on the internet. Anyways, the characters of Bungo Stray Dogs are named after Japanese authors, and their powers are based off their literary works. The inner bookworm in me was excited!!  So, this will be my project that I’ll try to continuously update as more characters are introduced!! Anyone is free to join this reading challenge.

*For some of the characters, it was hard finding a particular book that relates to their power. I’ll try to associate books with each character.

**Some books are difficult for me to find online.

The Armed Detective Agency

  • Atsushi Nakajima: The Moon Over the Mountain, and Other Stories
  • Osamu Dazai: No Longer Human
  • Yukichi Fukuzawa: The Autobiography of Yukichi Fukuzawa
  • Doppo Kunikida: River Mist & Other Stories
  • Edogawa Ranpo: The Black Lizard and Beast in the Shadows
  • Kenji Miyazawa: Night on the Galactic Railroad
  • Akiko Yosano: River of Stars: Selected Poems of Yosano Akiko
  • Jun’ichirō Tanizaki: Naomi
  • Kyouka Izumi: The Surgery Room

Port Mafia

  • Ryunosuke Akutagawa: Rashōmon
  • Chūya Nakahara: **
  • Ichiyou Higuchi: Takekurabe
  • Ougai Mori: The Dancing Girl
  • Yumeno Kyusaku: **
  • Kouyou Ozaki: The Golden Demon
  • Hirotsu Ryurō: **
  • Motojiro Kajii: Lemon
  • Michizō Tachihara: **
  • Sakunosuke Oda: Stories of Osaka

The Guild

  • F. Scott Fitzgerald: The Great Gatsby
  • Lousia May Alcott: Little Women
  • Nathaniel Hawthorne: The Scarlet Letter
  • Lucy Maud Montgomery: Anne of Green Gables
  • Margaret Mitchell: Gone With The Wind
  • Herman Melville: Moby Dick
  • Edgar Allan Poe: The Black Cat
  • Mark Twain: Huckleberry Finn
  • H.P. Lovecraft: The Call of Cthulhu

DNF: The Beautiful Lost by Luanne Rice

Here are three things to know about Maia:

1. Ever since her mother left, Maia’s struggled with depression — which once got so bad, she had to go to an institution for a while. She doesn’t want to go back.

2. Maia’s sure that if she finds her mother, if the two of them can talk about whale songs and constellations, then everything will be okay again.

3. She’s in love with Billy, the handsome, brooding boy who lives in the group home in town. He doesn’t seem to know that Maia exists… until now.

When Maia sets off on a road trip in search of her mom, Billy unexpectedly comes along. They drive up the East Coast, stopping along the way for lobster rolls and lighthouses. Maia learns that Billy has dark secrets of his own — and wants to outrun his past, too. But what will the future hold if they reach their destination?

From internationally bestselling author Luanne Rice, this is a sweeping, stunning story about the surprising directions our hearts can take.

When I picked up The Beautiful Lost by Luanne Rice, I was totally judging the book by the cover. I had a feeling that I would not like the book, but I gave it a chance. You can’t judge every book based on the cover, no matter how cheesy the book looks. My gut was right, I did not like the book. I am baffled. Honestly baffled because The Beautiful Lost has positive reviews on Goodreads. I guess my review will be controversial because I haven’t seen any negative reviews for this book.

What I liked about the book is that it did a good job at portraying abandonment issues that both Maia and Billy faced. That’s about it. What killed the book experience for me was the way depression was handled. Honestly hated how Maia would say her depression was gone because of her love interest Billy. I couldn’t believe what I had read. Nope, nope, nope. I had to put my book down, there’s no way that I can continue to read The Beautiful Lost. I don’t even want to know how the book ended. I tried reading it, but it was frustrating. Besides the story being cheesy, the romance was very instantaneous.

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Maia is a girl who has depression and even though her father and step-mother try to help her with her depression, she only blames her new step-mother. Maia misses her mother, and may I add that Maia’s mother only contacts her daughter by snail mail. The book is set in the present. The mom doesn’t reach out to her daughter. Maia’s mother left her family, and has left Maia with an emptiness in her heart. Maia desperately wants her mother back. She runs away from home in order to be with her mother. This aspect of the story I loved, but the romance was such a buzzkill for me.

I hated how there had to be a love interest. Couldn’t Billy just be a really good friend to Maia? The love interest that wasn’t fully developed even though they had a whole road trip to connect and learn about each other. I would have loved a greater emphasis on Maia’s issues and her growth as a person rather than force the reader to enjoy a contemporary love story. I tried to sympathize with Maia, but I am not on board with her romance. Now you may be wondering why I am against this story’s romance.  How did they even get together, you might be wondering. Well, Maia has never really talked to Billy at school. Billy is the mysterious teen attending the same school as Maia. Maia is completely head over heels in love with Billy. When Maia runs away, she stops in front of Billy’s residence. And what does he do? Billy runs away with her even though he doesn’t know her either! That’s a bit weird for me. I see Billy as a stranger because they aren’t even friends. How the heck are you going to let a stranger be with you on a trip? How? I get that Billy is Maia’s crush, but it feels gross for me .The story could have at least focused on some type of friendly relationship between Maia and Billy prior to the road trip. There is no established acquaintanceship between Maia and Billy, and both characters decide to take a trip together. Yeah, no thanks. Will I give The Beautiful Lost another chance? No.


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Final Rating: ⭐️

Book Themed Wedding

I’ve mentioned on my blog that I married earlier this year. I wanted to share a few snapshots from my wedding. Though not all of them of course since those are dear to my heart. Ha ha. Prior to the wedding, I had several ideas for the theme. I was very indecisive when it came to it. Though I looked on Pinterest and wedding magazines, I was overwhelmed by all my choices! I changed my theme depending on season and color, but somehow I knew that those ideas I had were not for me. My sister-in-law became my wedding planner and coordinator, and she helped me decided on a book themed wedding. The answer was simple and right in front of me. A book themed wedding for a bookworm like me!

A book themed wedding was very simple and aesthetically pleasing. My favorite part during wedding planning was shopping for several thrift books to be centerpieces. Specifically hardcovers. I know that Etsy and Ebay sell books, but I found those books to be a tad for more expensive. I felt that books from thrift stores was far more inexpensive. As for my bouquet, my sister-in-law made it for me. I had a lot of tremendous help which I am thankful for to this day!

When it comes to locations and finding the dream place can often be quite pricey. Trust me, I’ve been to several wedding venues to find the place. I was more invested in finding the perfect venue for the reception rather than the church. My husband and I traveled a lot to find the venue. I felt we travelled all over Southern California. There were some places that did not seem costly, but in fact were tremendously expensive. We did settle for a banquet hall because it was more budget friendly than having it at a restaurant or a country club. As for banquet halls, we found our place in Panorama City, CA. I don’t want to stereotype, but I’ll stereotype: I am Mexican and I have a big family. I needed a place that was going to big enough for all my relatives, without it being too costly. Platinum Banquet Hall in was the most economically friendly for us. What sealed the deal was an all you can eat buffet for all the guests. My family and I love to eat, so a buffet had won our hearts! The Church was the easiest one to find! I fell in love with Congregational Church-UCC immediately. It was so beautiful on the inside. I loved how it had a vintage feel to it. Anyways, I am sure you want to see the pictures.

Locations: 

  1. Congregational Church-UCC
    • 9659 Balboa Blvd, Northridge, CA 91325
  2. Platinum Banquet Hall
    • 8704 Van Nuys Blvd, Panorama City, CA 91402

Photography: Cinestory Films

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Jonesy Vol. 1 by Sam Humphries

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goodreads-synopsis

A sarcastic teenager with the powers of cupid unleashes her preternatural matchmaking abilities on her school with hilarious and charming results.

Jonesy is a self-described “cool dork” who spends her time making zines nobody reads, watching anime, and listening to riot grrrl bands and 1D simultaneously. But she has a secret nobody knows. She has the power to make people fall in love! Anyone. With anything. She’s a cupid in plaid. With a Tumblr. There’s only one catch—it doesn’t work on herself. She’s gonna have to find love the old-fashioned way, and in the meantime, figure out how to distract herself from the real emotions she inevitably has to face when her powers go wrong…

Written by Sam Humphries and illustrated by Caitlin Rose Boyle, this charming tale is sure to appeal to romantics and cynics alike

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I received Jonesy on Netgalley for an honest review, all opinions are my own.

I’ll keep this review short and sweet. Jonesy is an outcast at her school. She doesn’t have many friends besides two. She is obsessed with her favorite singer Stuff as any young girl would be. She doesn’t love the feeling of love and she tries to be against the social norm. Jonesy received her powers by watching Anime. She can manipulate people with mind control, but she can’t force people to love her.

Jonesy was a short entertaining comic, and if you’re expecting a plot to this book, there is none. Jonesy focuses on her misadventures and her plots that go wrong! It’s a fun read, but it could have been a bit better. I have to say I love how the cast is diverse. Lastly, I love the relationship Jonesy has with her puny donut loving father!

Final Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️