Top Ten Tuesday: All About The Villains

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. If you want to join, please check out the blog!!

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This week’s topic is All About The Villains. Here is my top ten list of villains that I have found to be terrifying!!

  1. Adolf Hitler (Wolf By Wolf) – He plays a crucial role in Wolf by Wolf, the main protagonist is set to kill him at all costs. Come on, this guy is evil in the fictional world and in real life. That’s why he’s my number one.
  2. Lord Voldemort (Harry Potter Series) – He Who Should Not Be Named. He’s responsible for many atrocities in the Wizarding World. He’s absolutely terrifying. He would have been my number one if I had not read Wolf by Wolf.
  3. Dolores Umbridge (Harry Potter Series) – Someone who I never, ever wan to encounter. She’s terrible. Absolutely dreadful.
  4. Queen Levana (Lunar Chronicles) – She’s the evil queen that does not have any redeeming qualities to her.
  5. The Darkling (The Grisha Trilogy) – Problematic favorite. He’s evil, but you sort of fall for him more than the main love interest.
  6. Marshall D. Teach/Blackbeard (One Piece)– I find Blackbeard to be horrifying. He’s one of the most interesting villains in One Piece. I found him scary and after what he did to Ace…well, you can see why he’s on my list.
  7. John Hobbes (The Diviners) –  Serial ghost killer? No thanks.
  8. Everyone (Lychee Light Club) – Just read it and you’ll see.
  9.  The Commandment (An Ember In The Ashes) – She was very spiteful. She’s one scary person.
  10. Light (Death Note) – Light owns the Death Note. He can write your name and you’re dead. Gone. Finished. He has all the powers in his hands. Yeah, he’s a guy that I wouldn’t mess with.

Top Ten Tuesday: Books On My Fall TBR

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. If you want to join, please check out the blog!!

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Hello, and good morning! It’s been such a long time since I last did a Top Ten Tuesday. Ha ha. Anyways, this week’s topic is Books On My Fall TBR! I have many books that I want to read and hopefully, if I don’t procrastinate, will try to read these books on my list.

  1. Crooked Kingdom.jpgGoodreads Synopsis: Kaz Brekker and his crew have just pulled off a heist so daring even they didn’t think they’d survive. But instead of divvying up a fat reward, they’re right back to fighting for their lives. Double-crossed and left crippled by the kidnapping of a valuable team member, the crew is low on resources, allies, and hope. As powerful forces from around the world descend on Ketterdam to root out the secrets of the dangerous drug known as jurda parem, old rivals and new enemies emerge to challenge Kaz’s cunning and test the team’s fragile loyalties. A war will be waged on the city’s dark and twisting streets―a battle for revenge and redemption that will decide the fate of magic in the Grisha world.
  2. Vassa In The NIghtGoodreads SynopsisIn the enchanted kingdom of Brooklyn, the fashionable people put on cute shoes, go to parties in warehouses, drink on rooftops at sunset, and tell themselves they’ve arrived. A whole lot of Brooklyn is like that now—but not Vassa’s working-class neighborhood.

    In Vassa’s neighborhood, where she lives with her stepmother and bickering stepsisters, one might stumble onto magic, but stumbling out again could become an issue. Babs Yagg, the owner of the local convenience store, has a policy of beheading shoplifters—and sometimes innocent shoppers as well. So when Vassa’s stepsister sends her out for light bulbs in the middle of night, she knows it could easily become a suicide mission.

    But Vassa has a bit of luck hidden in her pocket, a gift from her dead mother. Erg is a tough-talking wooden doll with sticky fingers, a bottomless stomach, and a ferocious cunning. With Erg’s help, Vassa just might be able to break the witch’s curse and free her Brooklyn neighborhood. But Babs won’t be playing fair. . . .

    Inspired by the Russian folktale Vassilissa the Beautiful and Sarah Porter’s years of experience teaching creative writing to New York City students.

  3. i'm not your manic pixie dream girlGoodreads Synopsis: Beatrice Maria Estrella Giovannini has life all figured out. She’s starting senior year at the top of her class, she’s a shoo-in for a scholarship to M.I.T., and she’s got a new boyfriend she’s crazy about. The only problem: All through high school Bea and her best friends Spencer and Gabe have been the targets of horrific bullying.

    So Bea uses her math skills to come up with The Formula, a 100% mathematically-guaranteed path to social happiness in high school. Now Gabe is on his way to becoming Student Body President, and Spencer is finally getting his art noticed. But when her boyfriend dumps her for Toile, the quirky new girl at school, Bea realizes it’s time to use The Formula for herself. She’ll be reinvented as the eccentric and lovable Trixie—a quintessential manic pixie dream girl—in order to win her boyfriend back and beat new-girl Toile at her own game.

    Unfortunately, being a manic pixie dream girl isn’t all it’s cracked up to be, and “Trixie” is causing unexpected consequences for her friends. As The Formula begins to break down, can Bea find a way to reclaim her true identity, and fix everything she’s messed up? Or will the casualties of her manic pixie experiment go far deeper than she could possibly imagine?

  4. The Night Itself.jpgGoodreads Synopsis: A breathtaking new urban fantasy trilogy from the critically acclaimed, award winning author of The Swan Kingdom and Shadows on the Moon.

    When fifteen year old Mio Yamato furtively sneaks the katana – an ancestral Japanese sword – out of its hiding place in her parent’s attic to help liven up her Christmas party costume, she has no idea of the darkness she is about to unleash on modern day London, or the family secrets that she is going to uncover.

    The paralysing paranoia that descends on her before she gets to her friend’s party is her first clue. The vivid and terrifying visions that nearly get her killed are a pretty good warning too.

    The giant nine-tailed cat demon that comes after the sword and tries to rip her throat out? Overkill.

    Seconds away from becoming kitty-food, Mio is saved by Shinobu, a mysterious warrior boy. But it’s already too late. Mio has ruptured the veil between the mortal realm and the Underworld, and now the gods and monsters of ancient Japan stalk the streets of London, searching for her and the sword.

    With the help of her best friend Jack, a fox spirit named Hikaru – and the devoted protection of the betwitchingly familiar Shinobu – Mio attempts to discover the true nature of the sword and its connection to the Yamato family. Because if she doesn’t learn how to control the katana’s incredible powers, she’s in danger of being overwhelmed by them. And if she can’t keep the sword safe from the terrible creatures who want it for their own, she’ll lose not only her own life… but the love of a lifetime.

  5. The GracesGoodreads Synopsis: Everyone said the Graces were witches.

    They moved through the corridors like sleek fish, ripples in their wake. Stares followed their backs and their hair.

    They had friends, but they were just distractions. They were waiting for someone different.

    All I had to do was show them that person was me.

    Like everyone else in her town, River is obsessed with the Graces, attracted by their glamour and apparent ability to weave magic. But are they really what they seem? And are they more dangerous than they let on?

    This beautifully-written thriller will grip you from its very first page.

  6. roald-dahls-book-of-ghost-storiesGoodreads Synopis:Who better to investigate the literary spirit world than that supreme connoisseur of the unexpected, Roald Dahl? Of the many permutations of the macabre, Dahl was always especially fascinated by the classic ghost story. For this superbly disquieting collection, he selected fourteen of his favorite tales by such authors as E.F. Benson, Rosemary Timperley, and Edith Wharton

    Includes:
    “W.S.” L.P. Hartley
    “Harry” Rosemary Timperley
    “The Corner Shop” Cynthia Asquith
    “In the Tube” E.F. Benson
    “Christmas Meeting” Rosemary Timperley
    “Elias and the Draug” Jonas Lie
    “Playmates” A.M. Burrage
    “Ringing the Changes” Robert Aickman
    “The Telephone” Mary Treadgold
    “The Ghost of a Hand” J. Sheridan Le Fanu
    “The Sweeper” A.M. Burrage
    “Afterward” Edith Wharton
    “On the Brighton Road” Richard Middleton
    “The Upper Berth” F. Marion CrawfordMilk and Honey.jpg

  7. Goodreads Synopsis: milk and honey is a collection of poetry and prose about survival. It is about the experience of violence, abuse, love, loss, and femininity. It is split into four chapters, and each chapter serves a different purpose, deals with a different pain, heals a different heartache. milk and honey takes readers through a journey of the most bitter moments in life and finds sweetness in them because there is sweetness everywhere if you are just willing to look.
  8. The Lightning Thief.jpgGoodreads Synopsis: Percy Jackson is a good kid, but he can’t seem to focus on his schoolwork or control his temper. And lately, being away at boarding school is only getting worse—Percy could have sworn his pre-algebra teacher turned into a monster and tried to kill him. When Percy’s mom finds out, she knows it’s time that he knew the truth about where he came from, and that he go to the one place he’ll be safe. She sends Percy to Camp Half Blood, a summer camp for demigods (on Long Island), where he learns that the father he never knew is Poseidon, God of the Sea. Soon a mystery unfolds and together with his friends—one a satyr and the other the demigod daughter of Athena—Percy sets out on a quest across the United States to reach the gates of the Underworld (located in a recording studio in Hollywood) and prevent a catastrophic war between the gods.
  9. vengeance road.jpgGoodreads Synopsis: Revenge is worth its weight in gold.

    When her father is murdered for a journal revealing the location of a hidden gold mine, eighteen-year-old Kate Thompson disguises herself as a boy and takes to the gritty plains looking for answers—and justice. What she finds are untrustworthy strangers, endless dust and heat, and a surprising band of allies, among them a young Apache girl and a pair of stubborn brothers who refuse to quit riding in her shadow. But as Kate gets closer to the secrets about her family, a startling truth becomes clear: some men will stop at nothing to get their hands on gold, and Kate’s quest for revenge may prove fatal.

  10. anne-of-green-gablesGoodreads Synopsis: Everyone’s favorite redhead, the spunky Anne Shirley, begins her adventures at Green Gables, a farm outside Avonlea, Prince Edward Island. When the freckled girl realizes that the elderly Cuthberts wanted to adopt a boy instead, she begins to try to win them and, consequently, the reader, over.

Top Ten Tuesday: Beach Reads

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. If you want to join, please check out the blog!!

Happy Tuesday! I hope everyone is having a great day. This week’s topic is Beach Reads. I don’t normally spend much time on the beach since I burn easily. Ha ha ha. I must confess that all the books on my list I have not read, but they are appropriate for this summer. Hopefully, I can get through all of them.

  1. The Summer of Chasing Mermaids – The youngest of six talented sisters, Elyse d’Abreau was destined for stardom—until a boating accident took everything from her. Now, the most beautiful singer in Tobago can’t sing. She can’t even speak.

    Seeking quiet solitude, Elyse accepts a friend’s invitation to Atargatis Cove. Named for the mythical first mermaid, the Oregon seaside town is everything Elyse’s home in the Caribbean isn’t: An ocean too cold for swimming, parties too tame for singing, and people too polite to pry—except for one.

    Christian Kane is a notorious playboy—insolent, arrogant, and completely charming. He’s also the only person in Atargatis Cove who doesn’t treat Elyse like a glass statue. He challenges her to express herself, and he admires the way she treats his younger brother Sebastian, who believes Elyse is the legendary mermaid come to life.

    When Christian needs a first mate for the Cove’s high-stakes Pirate Regatta, Elyse reluctantly stows her fear of the sea and climbs aboard. The ocean isn’t the only thing making waves, though—swept up in Christian’s seductive tide and entranced by the Cove’s charms, Elyse begins to wonder if a life of solitude isn’t what she needs. But changing course again means facing her past. It means finding her inner voice. And scariest of all, it means opening her heart to a boy who’s best known for breaking them . . .

  2. One Paris Summer  Most teens dream of visiting the City of Lights, but it feels more like a nightmare for Sophie Brooks. She and her brother are sent to Paris to spend the summer with their father, who left home a year ago without any explanation. As if his sudden abandonment weren’t betrayal enough, he’s about to remarry, and they’re expected to play nice with his soon-to-be wife and stepdaughter. The stepdaughter, Camille, agrees to show them around the city, but she makes it clear that she will do everything in her power to make Sophie miserable.Sophie could deal with all the pain and humiliation if only she could practice piano. Her dream is to become a pianist, and she was supposed to spend the summer preparing for a scholarship competition. Even though her father moved to Paris to pursue his own dream, he clearly doesn’t support hers. His promise to provide her with a piano goes unfulfilled.

    Still, no one is immune to Paris’s charm. After a few encounters with a gorgeous French boy, Sophie finds herself warming to the city, particularly when she discovers that he can help her practice piano. There’s just one hitch—he’s a friend of Camille’s, and Camille hates Sophie. While the summer Sophie dreaded promises to become best summer of her life, one person could ruin it all.

  3. We Own The Night  – Happy midnight, my fellow Niteowls…”

    As a candy store employee by day, and mysterious deejay “Niteowl” by night, eighteen-year-old Ingrid North is stuck between rock ‘n roll and a hard place. She can’t wait to get out of her tiny hometown of Steadfast, Nebraska (population three hundred and forty-seven) to chase her dreams, but small-town troubles keep getting in the way. She can’t abandon her grandmother with Alzheimer’s, or her best friend Micah–who she may or may not be in love with.

    But for one hour each Saturday, she escapes all of that. On air, she isn’t timid, ugly-sweater-wearing Ingrid North. She’s the funny and daring Niteowl. Every boy’s manic pixie dream girl. Fearless. And there is one caller in particular– Dark and Brooding–whose raspy laugh and snarky humor is just sexy enough to take her mind off Micah. Not that she’s in love with Micah or anything. Cause she’s not.

    As her grandmother slips further away and Micah begins dating a Mean-Girls-worthy nightmare, Ingrid runs to the mysterious Dark and Brooding as a disembodied voice to lean on, only to fall down a rabbit hole of punk rockstars, tabloid headlines, and kisses that taste like bubble tea. But the man behind the voice could be surprising in all the right, and wrong, ways.

    And she just might find that her real life begins when Niteowl goes off the air.

  4. The Unexpected Everything – Andie had it all planned out.

    When you are a politician’s daughter who’s pretty much raised yourself, you learn everything can be planned or spun, or both. Especially your future.

    Important internship? Check.

    Amazing friends? Check.

    Guys? Check (as long as we’re talking no more than three weeks).

    But that was before the scandal. Before having to be in the same house with her dad. Before walking an insane number of dogs. That was before Clark and those few months that might change her whole life.

    Because here’s the thing—if everything’s planned out, you can never find the unexpected.

    And where’s the fun in that?

  5. The Summer I Turned Pretty – Belly measures her life in summers. Everything good, everything magical happens between the months of June and August. Winters are simply a time to count the weeks until the next summer, a place away from the beach house, away from Susannah, and most importantly, away from Jeremiah and Conrad. They are the boys that Belly has known since her very first summer–they have been her brother figures, her crushes, and everything in between. But one summer, one terrible and wonderful summer, the more everything changes, the more it all ends up just the way it should have been all along.
  6. The Truth About Forever – That’s what Macy has to look forward to while her boyfriend, Jason, is away at Brain Camp. Days will be spent at a boring job in the library, evenings will be filled with vocabulary drills for the SATs, and spare time will be passed with her mother, the two of them sharing a silent grief at the traumatic loss of Macy’s father.

    But sometimes, unexpected things can happen—things such as the catering job at Wish, with its fun-loving, chaotic crew. Or her sister’s project of renovating the neglected beach house, awakening long-buried memories. Things such as meeting Wes, a boy with a past, a taste for Truth-telling, and an amazing artistic talent, the kind of boy who could turn any girl’s world upside down. As Macy ventures out of her shell, she begins to question her sheltered life.

    Is it really always better to be safe than sorry?

  7. The Notebook – Set amid the austere beauty of the North Carolina coast, The Notebook begins with the story of Noah Calhoun, a rural Southerner recently returned from the Second World War. Noah is restoring a plantation home to its former glory, and he is haunted by images of the beautiful girl he met fourteen years earlier, a girl he loved like no other. Unable to find her, yet unwilling to forget the summer they spent together, Noah is content to live with only memories…until she unexpectedly returns to his town to see him once again.

    Like a puzzle within a puzzle, the story of Noah and Allie is just the beginning. As it unfolds, their tale miraculously becomes something different, with much higher stakes. The result is a deeply moving portrait of love itself, the tender moments and the fundamental changes that affect us all. It is a story of miracles and emotions that will stay with you forever.

  8. Summer of My German Soldier – Minutes before the train pulled into the station in Jenkinsville, Arkansas, Patty Bergen knew something exciting was going to happen. But she never could have imagined that her summer would be so memorable. German prisoners of war have arrived to make their new home in the prison camp in Jenkinsville. To the rest of her town, these prisoners are only Nazis. But to Patty, a young Jewish girl with a turbulent home life, one boy in particular becomes an unlikely friend. Anton relates to Patty in ways that her mother and father never can. But when their forbidden relationship is discovered, will Patty risk her family and town for the understanding and love of one boy?
  9. The Distance from A to Z – Seventeen-year old Abby has only one goal for her summer: to make sure she is fluent in French—well, that, and to get as far away from baseball and her Cubs-obsessed family as possible. A summer of culture and language, with no sports in sight.

    That turns out to be impossible, though, because her French partner is the exact kind of boy she was hoping to avoid. Eight weeks. 120 hours of class. 80 hours of conversation practice with someone who seems to exclusively wear baseball caps and jerseys.

    But Zeke in French is a different person than Zeke in English. And Abby can’t help but fall for him, hard. As Abby begins to suspect that Zeke is hiding something, she has to decide if bridging the gap between the distance between who she is and who he is, is worth the risk.

  10. Perfect Chemistry – A fresh, urban twist on the classic tale of star-crossed lovers.

    When Brittany Ellis walks into chemistry class on the first day of senior year, she has no clue that her carefully created ‘perfect’ life is about to unravel before her eyes. She’s forced to be lab partners with Alex Fuentes, a gang member from the other side of town, and he is about to threaten everything she’s worked so hard for: her flawless reputation, her relationship with her boyfriend, and the secret that her home life is anything but perfect.

    Alex is a bad boy and he knows it. So when he makes a bet with his friends to lure Brittany into his life, he thinks nothing of it. But soon Alex realizes Brittany is a real person with real problems, and suddenly the bet he made in arrogance turns into something much more.

    In a passionate story about looking beneath the surface, Simone Elkeles breaks through the stereotypes and barriers that threaten to keep Brittany and Alex apart.

Top Ten Tuesday: Books I Feel Differently About Now That Time Has Passed

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. If you want to join, please check out the blog!!

This week’s topic is Ten Books That I Feel Differently About Now That Time Has Passed. A challenging topic, I’m not going to lie. I’ve checked all the books I’ve read on my Goodreads account, and here are my choices:

  1. Twilight Series: Although I haven’t read the last book in the series, I don’t have much love for this series. I was never a huge fan of the books. They were all tolerable, but I only really liked one book and that was New Moon. I tried re-reading Twilight, and I couldn’t get past one hundred pages. I put the book down, and ever since then, I have not touched it. If I were in middle school, I know I would would have found it more enjoyable. As an adult, I can’t physically force myself to read the books. (I know a lot of people will have this series on their Top Ten Tuesday, I have a hunch).
  2. Mara Dyer Trilogy – Don’t even read the books. It’s one of those series that has an interesting premise and beautiful covers, but there are so many plot holes and Noah Shaw is written to be too perfect. He’s rich, he’s British and American and something else, and he hardly has any flaws…The overall series was horrible, the only book that was the “best” one was the sequel.
  3. Red Queen – Why did I give this book a three???? The more I think about Red Queen, the more I realize how much of a terrible book it was. Frustrating protagonists, and I should have seen that plot twist coming. I’m not even sure I’ll read the sequel at this point, but who knows if the second book is better.
  4. The 52nd – Even though the synopsis sounded cool, I hated it. It’s another book that I gave a three, but it really deserves a 1.5. The secondary characters had better relationship with their partners instead of the protagonists. The protagonists had a love-hate relationship that was not cute at all.
  5. This Is How You Lose Her – A collection of short stories that centers around Yunior…one of my least favorite male protagonists. There is no redeeming factor to him. I gave donated this book. When I read this, I thought it was okay, but as time went by I knew I couldn’t keep this book on my shelf.
  6. Love Letters To The Dead: When I first read it, I thought it was great. I rated it a four out of five, but thinking about it now, I don’t like it. I even gave the book away to a friend. The main character was terrible.
  7. In Real Life – The story could have been expanded, but it was too short and rushed. The animation style is still beautiful.
  8. The Girl Who Leapt Through Time – Watch the anime adaptation instead of reading the book. It was too short, and not memorable. If only it were longer. Also, unnecessary second short story that had nothing to do with The Girl Who Leapt Through Time.
  9. Brave New World – Initially, I hated this book. I couldn’t get passed several chapters without giving up. It was always recommended to me when I was younger. When this book was assigned for my english college class, I had to read it, there was no way getting out of not reading this book. I had no excuses. After finishing Brave New World, I liked it much better. It’s not amazing, but it’s good.
  10. Bras & Broomsticks – I’ve forgotten about this book, but what I can vaguely remember is that it’s not one of the best books I’ve read about witches. Nope. It was suppose to be hilarious and filled with hijinks, but I didn’t find it funny. I found it okay when I first read it. I don’t find it amusing at all currently.

Top Ten Tuesday: Non-Bookish Websites That I Love

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. If you want to join, please check out the blog!!

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Hey, and good evening or early midnight morning. Well, whatever floats your boat! I know that it’s barely midnight and it’s Wednesday, not Tuesday, but I just out of the movie theatre because I saw Captain America Civil War which was amazing!! Let me just say that I highly recommend watching the movie and I don’t want to spoil it for anyone, so trust me, go watch it!

This week’s topic is  Favorite Websites That Are Non Bookish. I go to a lot of websites daily and here my picks. It is going to be a combination of online stores and social media sites.

  1. Tumblr – Love going on Tumblr. I can spend hours on Tumblr without even noticing the time
  2. Crunchyroll – Anime. Anime. Anime. I’m currently watching three shows from the Spring 2016 season.
  3. Instagram – Who doesn’t like scrolling through photos? 🙂
  4. Random Curiosity – Anime related, mostly reviews and impressions. Recommend checking that site out.
  5. Netflix – Yassss. A must since I don’t have cable.
  6. Viki – Asian Dramas
  7. Ebay – I usually buy cute korean stationary and washi tape from ebay, and cheap anime goods.
  8. Punimelt – kawaii
  9. Omocat – merchandise
  10. Etsy – I love custom items. Mostly shop for candles and other goods.

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Top Ten Tuesday: Favorite Bookish People

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. If you want to join, please check out the blog!!

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This week’s topic is Favorite Bookish People You Follow. I decided to include booktubers and bookstagrammers for my list! You should totally check these peeps out! 😀

  1. Thoughts on Tomes – probably one of my favorite booktubers since she and I have similar interests in books.
  2. PeruseProject – Always has great book recommendations!
  3. jessethereader
  4. Tashapolis
  5. @lookingforabura
  6. @bookmarauder
  7. abookutopia
  8. @lottelikesbooks
  9. @twirlingpages
  10. WhittyNovels

Top Ten Tuesday: Books I Love But Haven’t Talked About In A While

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. If you want to join, please check out the blog!!

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This weeks theme is Books I Love But Haven’t Talked About In A While. Usually I talk about the same books all the time such as the Lunar Chronicles, Harry Potter, The Wrath and The Dawn, The Winner’s Trilogy, and so on! These books on my list are part of my favorite books, and its a darn shame that I don’t talk about it here on my blog! I recommend all my books on my list, and most of them happen to be historical fiction.

  1. A Thousand Splendid Suns – After 103 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list and with four million copies of The Kite Runner shipped, Khaled Hosseini returns with a beautiful, riveting, and haunting novel that confirms his place as one of the most important literary writers today.Propelled by the same superb instinct for storytelling that made The Kite Runner a beloved classic, A Thousand Splendid Suns is at once an incredible chronicle of thirty years of Afghan history and a deeply moving story of family, friendship, faith, and the salvation to be found in love.

    Born a generation apart and with very different ideas about love and family, Mariam and Laila are two women brought jarringly together by war, by loss and by fate. As they endure the ever escalating dangers around them—in their home as well as in the streets of Kabul—they come to form a bond that makes them both sisters and mother-daughter to each other, and that will ultimately alter the course not just of their own lives but of the next generation. With heart-wrenching power and suspense, Hosseini shows how a woman’s love for her family can move her to shocking and heroic acts of self-sacrifice, and that in the end it is love, or even the memory of love, that is often the key to survival.

    A stunning accomplishment, A Thousand Splendid Suns is a haunting, heartbreaking, compelling story of an unforgiving time, an unlikely friendship, and an indestructible love.

  2. Honolulu – The story of a young immigrant bride in a ramshackle town that becomes a great modern city

    “In Korea in those days, newborn girls were not deemed important enough to be graced with formal names, but were instead given nicknames, which often reflected the parents’ feelings on the birth of a daughter:  I knew a girl named Anger, and another called Pity.  As for me, my parents named me Regret.”

    Honolulu is the rich, unforgettable story of a young “picture bride” who journeys to Hawai’i in 1914 in search of a better life.

    Instead of the affluent young husband and chance at an education that she has been promised, she is quickly married off to a poor, embittered laborer who takes his frustrations out on his new wife. Renaming herself Jin, she makes her own way in this strange land, finding both opportunity and prejudice. With the help of three of her fellow picture brides, Jin prospers along with her adopted city, now growing from a small territorial capital into the great multicultural city it is today.  But paradise has its dark side, whether it’s the daily struggle for survival in Honolulu’s tenements, or a crime that will become the most infamous in the islands’ history…

    With its passionate knowledge of people and places in Hawai’i far off the tourist track, Honolulu is most of all the spellbinding tale of four women in a new world, united by dreams, disappointment, sacrifices, and friendship.

  3. Peony In Love – “I finally understand what the poets have written. In spring, moved to passion; in autumn only regret.”For young Peony, betrothed to a suitor she has never met, these lyrics from The Peony Pavilion mirror her own longings. In the garden of the Chen Family Villa, amid the scent of ginger, green tea, and jasmine, a small theatrical troupe is performing scenes from this epic opera, a live spectacle few females have ever seen. Like the heroine in the drama, Peony is the cloistered daughter of a wealthy family, trapped like a good-luck cricket in a bamboo-and-lacquer cage. Though raised to be obedient, Peony has dreams of her own.

    Peony’s mother is against her daughter’s attending the production: “Unmarried girls should not be seen in public.” But Peony’s father assures his wife that proprieties will be maintained, and that the women will watch the opera from behind a screen. Yet through its cracks, Peony catches sight of an elegant, handsome man with hair as black as a cave–and is immediately overcome with emotion.

    So begins Peony’s unforgettable journey of love and destiny, desire and sorrow–as Lisa See’s haunting new novel, based on actual historical events, takes readers back to seventeenth-century China, after the Manchus seize power and the Ming dynasty is crushed.

    Steeped in traditions and ritual, this story brings to life another time and place–even the intricate realm of the afterworld, with its protocols, pathways, and stages of existence, a vividly imagined place where one’s soul is divided into three, ancestors offer guidance, misdeeds are punished, and hungry ghosts wander the earth. Immersed in the richness and magic of the Chinese vision of the afterlife, transcending even death, Peony in Love explores, beautifully, the many manifestations of love. Ultimately, Lisa See’s new novel addresses universal themes: the bonds of friendship, the power of words, and the age-old desire of women to be heard.

  4. Fahrenheit 451 – The terrifyingly prophetic novel of a post-literate future.Guy Montag is a fireman. His job is to burn books, which are forbidden, being the source of all discord and unhappiness. Even so, Montag is unhappy; there is discord in his marriage. Are books hidden in his house? The Mechanical Hound of the Fire Department, armed with a lethal hypodermic, escorted by helicopters, is ready to track down those dissidents who defy society to preserve and read books.

    The classic dystopian novel of a post-literate future, Fahrenheit 451 stands alongside Orwell’s 1984 and Huxley’s Brave New World as a prophetic account of Western civilization’s enslavement by the media, drugs and conformity.

    Bradbury’s powerful and poetic prose combines with uncanny insight into the potential of technology to create a novel which, decades on from first publication, still has the power to dazzle and shock.

  5. Snow Flower And The Secret Fan – In nineteenth-century China, in a remote Hunan county, a girl named Lily, at the tender age of seven, is paired with a laotong, “old same,” in an emotional match that will last a lifetime. The laotong, Snow Flower, introduces herself by sending Lily a silk fan on which she’s painted a poem in nu shu, a unique language that Chinese women created in order to communicate in secret, away from the influence of men.As the years pass, Lily and Snow Flower send messages on fans, compose stories on handkerchiefs, reaching out of isolation to share their hopes, dreams, and accomplishments. Together, they endure the agony of foot-binding, and reflect upon their arranged marriages, shared loneliness, and the joys and tragedies of motherhood. The two find solace, developing a bond that keeps their spirits alive. But when a misunderstanding arises, their deep friendship suddenly threatens to tear apart.
  6. In The Time Of The Butterflies – Set during the waning days of the Trujillo dictatorship in the Dominican Republic in 1960, this extraordinary novel tells the story the Mirabal sisters, three young wives and mothers who are assassinated after visiting their jailed husbands.From the author of How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents comes this tale of courage and sisterhood set in the Dominican Republic during the rise of the Trujillo dictatorship. A skillful blend of fact and fiction, In the Time of the Butterflies is inspired by the true story of the three Mirabal sisters who, in 1960, were murdered for their part in an underground plot to overthrow the government. Alvarez breathes life into these historical figures–known as “las mariposas,” or “the butterflies,” in the underground–as she imagines their teenage years, their gradual involvement with the revolution, and their terror as their dissentience is uncovered.

    Alvarez’s controlled writing perfectly captures the mounting tension as “the butterflies” near their horrific end. The novel begins with the recollections of Dede, the fourth and surviving sister, who fears abandoning her routines and her husband to join the movement. Alvarez also offers the perspectives of the other sisters: brave and outspoken Minerva, the family’s political ringleader; pious Patria, who forsakes her faith to join her sisters after witnessing the atrocities of the tyranny; and the baby sister, sensitive Maria Teresa, who, in a series of diaries, chronicles her allegiance to Minerva and the physical and spiritual anguish of prison life.

    In the Time of the Butterflies is an American Library Association Notable Book and a 1995 National Book Critics Circle Award nominee.

  7. Hard-Boiled Wonderland And The End Of The World – ‘A narrative particle accelerator that zooms between Wild Turkey Whiskey and Bob Dylan, unicorn skulls and voracious librarians, John Coltrane and Lord Jim. Science fiction, detective story and post-modern manifesto all rolled into one rip-roaring novel, Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World is the tour de force that expanded Haruki Murakami’s international following. Tracking one man’s descent into the Kafkaesque underworld of contemporary Tokyo, Murakami unites East and West, tragedy and farce, compassion and detachment, slang and philosophy.’
  8. Flowers For Algernon – With more than five million copies sold, Flowers for Algernon is the beloved, classic story of a mentally disabled man whose experimental quest for intelligence mirrors that of Algernon, an extraordinary lab mouse. In poignant diary entries, Charlie tells how a brain operation increases his IQ and changes his life. As the experimental procedure takes effect, Charlie’s intelligence expands until it surpasses that of the doctors who engineered his metamorphosis. The experiment seems to be a scientific breakthrough of paramount importance–until Algernon begins his sudden, unexpected deterioration. Will the same happen to Charlie?
  9. Where The Red Fern Grows – A loving threesome, they ranged the dark hills and river bottoms of Cherokee country. Old Dan had the brawn. Little Ann had the brains, and Billy had the will to make them into the finest hunting team in the valley. Glory and victory were coming to them, but sadness waited too. Where the Red Fern Grows is an exciting tale of love and adventure you’ll never forget.
  10. The Outsiders – According to Ponyboy, there are two kinds of people in the world: greasers and socs. A soc (short for “social”) has money, can get away with just about anything, and has an attitude longer than a limousine. A greaser, on the other hand, always lives on the outside and needs to watch his back. Ponyboy is a greaser, and he’s always been proud of it, even willing to rumble against a gang of socs for the sake of his fellow greasers–until one terrible night when his friend Johnny kills a soc. The murder gets under Ponyboy’s skin, causing his bifurcated world to crumble and teaching him that pain feels the same whether a soc or a greaser.

 

Top Ten Books I Wouldn’t Mind Santa Leaving Under My Tree

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. If you want to join, please check out the blog!

This week’s topic is Top 10 Books I Wouldn’t Mind Santa Leaving Under My Tree. All the books on my list are books that I have not read, but have been meaning to!! Most of these books happen to be fantasy!

  1.  Falling Kingdoms by Morgan Rhodesfalling kingdoms
  2. A Wizard Of Earthsea by Ursula K. Le Guina wizard of earthsea
  3. The Book Of Three by Lloyd Alexanderthe book of three
  4. Queen Of The Tearling by Erika Johansenqueen of the tearling
  5. The False Prince by Jennifer A. Nielsenthe false prince
  6. A Darker Shade Of Magic by V.E. SchwabA Darker Shade final for Irene
  7. Air Awakens by Elise Kovaair awakens
  8. A Frozen Heart by Elizabeth Rudnick a frozen heart
  9. I’ll Give You The Sun by Jandy Nelsoni'll give you the sun
  10. Maybe Someday by Colleen Hoover maybe someday